Blog

  • Chamber Honors Business Leaders http://fw.to/cQzUESJ

    Posted on 22, February, 2017

    http://fw.to/cQzUESJ

  • New minimum wage increase goes into effect on Saturday

    Posted on 04, January, 2017

    STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- George Zaloom, owner of Zalooms Auto Repair in Westerleigh, says his technicians are some of the highest paid in the industry.

    But he also hires apprentices, who start at minimum wage rates.

    With the increase in minimum wage that goes into affect on Saturday, Zaloom says he'll have to limit hiring and/or raise prices.
     
    "Since most minimum wage jobs are entry level, I feel the increase will cause many problems across the board since those making even $20 per hour will request a raise. In the end it will affect jobs and prices," he said.

    Zaloom is one of many Staten Island business owners who fear the historic increase in the minimum wage championed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo -- which will ultimately reach $15 an hour for all workers across New York -- may hurt his bottom line.

    MINIMUM WAGE HIKE STIPULATIONS

    Minimum wage is currently $9 an hour across New York state.

    On Saturday, Dec. 31, workers in New York City employed by large businesses (those with at least 11 employees), will receive an $11 per hour minimum wage. The wage will jump by another $2 each year after, reaching $15 on Dec. 31, 2018.

    For workers in New York City employed by small businesses (those with 10 employees or fewer), the minimum wage rises to $10.50 on Saturday. It will increase by another $1.50 each year after, reaching $15 on Dec. 31, 2019.

    "By moving to a $15 statewide minimum wage and enacting the strongest paid family leave policy in the nation, New York is showing the way forward on economic justice," said Cuomo.

    "These policies will not only lift up the current generation of low-wage workers and their families, but ensure fairness for future generations and enable them to climb the ladder of opportunity," he added.

    TRICKLE UP EFFECT

    Barry Crupi, owner of Barry's Auto Body in Eltingville, which employees 20 people, said that while all his employees make more than minimum wage, he fears a "trickle up effect."

    "There will most certainly be a trickle up effect at some point. For example, if someone working the counter at McDonald's is making $11 per hour and one of my employees is making $15 per hour, there is now only a $4-an-hour difference between an unskilled worker and a skilled worker," he said.

    "So when that unskilled worker graduates to a skilled position, she/he will be seeking much more than $15 per hour, which means hourly rates for labor will be forced to rise across the board. That can have an unanticipated negative effect on consumers as businesses raise their prices to cover the increased wage costs," Crupi added.

    He noted he's "in favor of a fair wage paid for a fair day's work, which is why my employees make greater than minimum wage."

    But he said he believes those wages "should be set by the market, not by arbitrary laws."

    PRICE HIKE PASSED ONTO THE CONSUMER

    Many business owners say the prices businesses pay for the minimum wage hike will eventually be passed onto the consumer.

    "I believe this mandatory minimum wage will do more harm than good because the increased cost of doing business will ultimately be passed onto the consumer. (This) means that the cost for service will go up in line with the wage increase causing that minimum wage earner to have to pay more for his/her purchases, which leaves them in the same condition they were before of not being able to afford the goods and service," said Crupi.

    FOOD & BEVERAGE INDUSTRY TO SEE GREATEST IMPACT?

    Michael Behar, president of the Staten Island Downtown Alliance, which represents approximately 652 businesses along the Bay Street corridor with an estimated 5,260 employees earning an average of $37,481 per year, said the minimum wage hike will have its greatest affect on business owners in the food and beverage industry.

    "This will also put them (food and beverage business owners) in a quandary over what to pay managers who typically make between $15 and $18 dollars per hour," he said.

    "If they have to raise their salaries as well, the costs must be passed on to consumers. Unfortunately, if the area in which the restaurant is located can't support the increased prices, we could see those businesses failing and leaving everyone out of work," said Behar.

    WORKERS REJOICE

    However, this means a 22 percent rise in gross income for hundreds of thousands of workers, including tens of thousands of healthcare workers.

    "I feel at ease. We've been struggling for a long time. This raise will make things better. After paying bills, I might buy some clothes. The fight for $15 was worth it because it made home care workers visible," said Anna Couch, a home care worker on Staten Island.

  • Make some room for Tablet Technology in the Auto Shop

    Posted on 04, January, 2017

    Tablet Technology enters the neighborhood garage!

    Zaloom's Auto Repair is pleased to announce that they have incorporated a popular, user friendly technological tool - the tablet - into their daily business operation to provide a more efficient and engaging automotive repair experience for their customers.

    While a 31 point inspection has always been the starting point for any vehicle that enters Zaloom's, the process and review of these individual car inspections or "check ups" has become more efficient and more easily executed through the use of an IPAD and a software program called, Auto Vitals.

    "It is common practice for healthcare professionals to interact with their patients while using a tablet. It's almost routine to see your doctor enter the exam room with tablet in hand and that's a good thing. It gives them ready access to information such as your health records, past appointments, inoculation schedules, etc. This gives the people in your life, who help you maintain good health, do that in the most efficient and comprehensive way possible. And, that is what we are doing for our customers and their cars. We are using tools that will better help us execute our philosophy of: we are here to keep your vehicle in good health", said George Zaloom, owner of Zaloom's Auto Repair.

    Cars that arrive at Zaloom's Auto Repair first go through a 31 Point Courtesy Check to uncover any and all issues, all of which is reported to the customer. This process allows Zaloom's to not only find any potential problems but also provides an opportunity to educate their customers about them and options to have them corrected.

    To help with the 31 Point Courtesy Check, each technician has his own IPAD loaded with the history of your car, manufactures recommendations, bulletins and recalls, in addition to the repair order. The IPAD, through the use of the Auto Vitals software program, allows the technician to communicate with the service desk and the service desk to the technician. Technicians are able to take photos of issues, record noises, and email this type of information directly to the customers, thereby engaging the customer in the repair.

    As personal as the counter experience would be, the online experience helps motorists to rely on their trusted mechanics, even when their busy lives does not allow them to be at the counter. (as stated on the Auto Vitals website).

    History of Zaloom's.....

    Eighty years ago, Grandpa Michael started it all at OK Auto Body on Barker St. and from that point on there was oil in our blood. The Zaloom's have been making Staten Island a better place to drive ever since.There's nothing that can replace experience and hard work when it comes to getting you back on the road quickly and safely, and that's the difference you'll see in every job we do. We're the kind of people who don't get tired of happy customers, and we'll never get tired of doing great work
    The All-American, local garage is alive and well; four generations deep.

  • How to Avoid the Auto Repair Shop This Winter

    Posted on 04, January, 2017

    A local auto shop is urging drivers to follow some important safety tips this winter. 

    The owner of Zaloom's Auto Repair says drivers should pay close attention to their wiper blades during the cold-weather months. 

    Mechanics say not to use your wipers to remove ice from your windshield. Doing so, can cause heavy damage to the blades. 

    Staff also say to make sure all tires are filled properly and have a good amount of tread. 

    When it comes to poor road conditions, mechanics say to keep an eye out for raised sewer caps to avoid costly repairs. 

    "If you're going down a street that you knew was ripped up, try to hit the sewer cap with your tire - this way you'll protect it from the middle of the suspension of the car being damaged," said Shop Owner George Zaloom.

    Zaloom also recommends keeping a blanket in your car so you won't have to leave the engine running if you get stuck in snow. 

  • Make some room for Tablet

    Posted on 23, August, 2016

    Make some room for Tablet Technology in the Auto Shop

     
    By 
    on March 01, 2016 at 3:59 PM, updated March 04, 2016 at 8:23 AM
     
     
     

    Tablet Technology enters the neighborhood garage!

    Zaloom's Auto Repair is pleased to announce that they have incorporated a popular, user friendly technological tool – the tablet - into their daily business operation to provide a more efficient and engaging automotive repair experience for their customers.

    While a 31 point inspection has always been the starting point for any vehicle that enters Zaloom's, the process and review of these individual car inspections or "check ups" has become more efficient and more easily executed through the use of an IPAD and a software program called, Auto Vitals.

    "It is common practice for healthcare professionals to interact with their patients while using a tablet. It's almost routine to see your doctor enter the exam room with tablet in hand and that's a good thing. It gives them ready access to information such as your health records, past appointments, inoculation schedules, etc. This gives the people in your life, who help you maintain good health, do that in the most efficient and comprehensive way possible. And, that is what we are doing for our customers and their cars. We are using tools that will better help us execute our philosophy of: we are here to keep your vehicle in good health", said George Zaloom, owner of Zaloom's Auto Repair.

    Cars that arrive at Zaloom's Auto Repair first go through a 31 Point Courtesy Check to uncover any and all issues, all of which is reported to the customer. This process allows Zaloom's to not only find any potential problems but also provides an opportunity to educate their customers about them and options to have them corrected.

    To help with the 31 Point Courtesy Check, each technician has his own IPAD loaded with the history of your car, manufactures recommendations, bulletins and recalls, in addition to the repair order. The IPAD, through the use of the Auto Vitals software program, allows the technician to communicate with the service desk and the service desk to the technician. Technicians are able to take photos of issues, record noises, and email this type of information directly to the customers, thereby engaging the customer in the repair.

    As personal as the counter experience would be, the online experience helps motorists to rely on their trusted mechanics, even when their busy lives does not allow them to be at the counter. (as stated on the Auto Vitals website).

    History of Zaloom's.....

    Eighty years ago, Grandpa Michael started it all at OK Auto Body on Barker St. and from that point on there was oil in our blood. The Zaloom's have been making Staten Island a better place to drive ever since.There's nothing that can replace experience and hard work when it comes to getting you back on the road quickly and safely, and that's the difference you'll see in every job we do. We're the kind of people who don't get tired of happy customers, and we'll never get tired of doing great work
    The All-American, local garage is alive and well; four generations deep.